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Experience


Southwest Airlines® Chinese New Year Parade
Feb
11
5:00pm 5:00pm

Southwest Airlines® Chinese New Year Parade

  • Market and Second Street to Kearny and Jackson (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Named one of the top ten Parades in the world by the International Festivals and Events Association (IFEA), the Southwest Airlines® Chinese New Year Parade in San Francisco is one of the grandest night illuminated Parades in the country. Started in the 1860s by the Chinese in San Francisco as a means to educate the community about their culture, the Parade and Festival have grown to be the largest celebration of Asian culture outside of Asia. Parade highlights include elaborate floats, lion dancers, folk dancers, costumed elementary school groups, marching bands, stilt walkers, Chinese acrobats, and a 268-foot-long Golden Dragon (“Gum Lung”).

$30 Bleacher Tickets available: (415) 889-8823 or (415) 982-3071. If you can't watch the Parade in person, watch the live broadcast on KTVU Fox 2 or KTSF 26 (Chinese broadcast) on Saturday, February 11th, 6-8pm.

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Chinese New Year Community Street Fair
Feb
11
to Feb 12

Chinese New Year Community Street Fair

  • Grant Avenue from Clay to Broadway; Washington, Jackson & Pacific between Stockton & Kearny San Francisco, CA (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Immerse yourself in the sights and sounds of San Francisco’s exhilarating Chinatown during one of the community’s most exciting times of the year. You will find over 120 booths and concessions making this a shopper's paradise. The SF Chinese Chamber of Commerce has planned activities and entertainment for all ages. Enjoy Chinese folk dancing, opera, drumming and much more at the entertainment stage on Washington St. below Grant. Make sure you get a family photo with the giant puppets and other memorable artifacts from the Parade.

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Chinese New Year Flower Market Fair
Jan
21
to Jan 22

Chinese New Year Flower Market Fair

  • Grant Avenue from Clay to Broadway; Washington, Jackson & Pacific between Stockton & Kearny (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Oranges, tangerines, flowers, plants, and a variety of auspicious foods are just a few of the many new year items for sale at the Flower Market Fair. Oranges and tangerines are symbols of abundant happiness. Tangerines with leaves intact assure that one’s relationship with another remains secure. For newlyweds, this represents the branching of the couple into a family with many children. Every traditional Chinese household should have live blooming plants to symbolize rebirth and new growth. Traditional Chinese entertainment such as Chinese Opera and lion dancing will be performed on stage both days.  

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"Eat Chinatown" Photo Exhibit
Jan
20
5:00pm 5:00pm
art

"Eat Chinatown" Photo Exhibit

ABOUT THE SHOW

 

EAT CHINATOWN is a photo exhibit at 41 Ross that commemorates classic Chinatown restaurants, diners and bakeries that have been operating for at least 40 years. Photographer Andria Lo and writer Valerie Luu (founders of Chinatown Pretty, a street-style blog that documents Chinatown seniors) profiled four eateries and their faithful patrons to understand San Francisco Chinatown’s food culture.

 

The exhibit focuses on four well-loved restaurants: New Lun Ting Cafe (also known as Pork Chop House), Capital Restaurant, Hon’s Wun-Tun House and Eastern Bakery.  Eastern Bakery is the oldest Chinese bakery in North America, having been established in 1924. The show also remembers ones that have since closed over the years -- such as Empress of China --  but are still reminisced by Chinatown residents and San Franciscans.

 

Chinatown restaurants have served multiple purposes in the community. First and foremost, a place to eat affordable home-style comfort food. Many of the menus are unique to San Francisco’s Chinatown (the oldest in the the Western hemisphere) reflecting a combination of American, Chinese American, Hong Kong and Chinese cuisines, sometimes all on one plate. It provided a sense of community and shield from discrimination experienced in other neighborhoods. It was also a landing pad for immigrants looking for work as it required little English. And as the Chinese Exclusion Act barred Chinese people from freely entering the United States, restaurants owners were able to use their merchant status to sponsor family members and people from their villages, giving them a ticket into the States and economic opportunity.

 

The Eat Chinatown exhibit will feature personal narratives, present-day and historic photos and ephemera. It aims to capture what these establishments mean to the SF community, to three generations of San Franciscans and to people who simply love Chinese food.

 

The artists, along with assistance from the Chinatown Community Development Center (CCDC), selected a range of restaurants that hold nostalgic value to the San Francisco community. It’s not necessarily the tourists spots or the banquet halls reserved for special occasions -- it’s the mom-and-pop shops where people duck in few times a week for dinner; places where people’s parents and grandparents took them growing up.

 

The Chinatown Community Development Center, the nonprofit sponsor of the show, says that they hope people will come enjoy food at the restaurants and learn more about people who run and frequent these eateries. “Some people remember Chinatown of the past with its vibrant nightlife frequented by celebrities like the Beatles and Frank Sinatra. But Chinatown eateries continues to provide employment, community, and a taste of home for new generations of immigrants, Chinese-Americans families with ties to neighborhood and the range of office workers and tourists who come to Chinatown,” said Roy Chan, community planning manager at CCDC. “We want to share the stories of our restaurants past and present to demonstrate that Chinatown has always been thriving.”

 

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

 

Photographer Andria Lo and writer Valerie Luu are the duo behind Chinatown Pretty, a street-style blog and Instagram (@chinatownpretty). Chinatown Pretty celebrates the street-style of seniors living (and grocery shopping) in San Francisco’s Chinatown.

 

Their work has been featured in the San Francisco Chronicle, Design*Sponge, Quartz, KQED and the Asian Art Museum.

 

This exhibit is their second collaboration with CCDC telling neighborhood stories from San Francisco’s Chinatown. In early 2016, they did a self-titled photo exhibit focused on Chinatown fashion.

 

ARTIST BIOS

 

Andria Lo is a freelance documentary and editorial photographer whose work can be found in Lucky Peach, SF Magazine and Jarry. She was formerly the photo director of the Asian American arts and culture publication, Hyphen Magazine. In 2015, she received a public art grant to feature her collaborations with San Francisco Botanical Garden on Muni buses. Find her online at andrialo.com.

 

Valerie Luu writes about San Francisco. Past projects include Sublet SF, where she subletted in eight neighborhoods in two years (including a six-month stint in Chinatown.) She’s currently working #100drinksdivis, a series of Instagram portraits where she has a drink with 100 different neighbors around Divisadero. She is also 1/2 of Rice Paper Scissors, a Vietnamese pop-up restaurant.

 

ABOUT 41 ROSS

 

41 Ross is a community space for creative engagement, where art, culture, and placemaking connect in San Francisco Chinatown’s Ross Alley. 41 Ross is a collaboration between the Chinatown Community Development Center and the Chinese Culture Foundation. 41 Ross is an active community space that brings together the general public including local residents, neighbors, and visitors to engage in art/culture making activities.

 

More than an art gallery, 41 Ross is a community resource space and interactive studio that promotes dialogue, appreciation, and creative engagement around the local culture practiced by everyday people in Chinatown. Its cultural programming serves to activate Ross Alley and other public spaces in Chinatown.

 

ABOUT SPOTLIGHT CHINATOWN

 

The photo exhibit is a part of Spotlight Chinatown, a project of the Chinatown Community Development Center supported by the San Francisco Office of Economic and Workforce Development and SFMTA.

The goal of Spotlight Chinatown is to promote local businesses, especially those that are impacted by the Central Subway construction and to highlight Chinatown’s unique neighborhood character through photographs and stories. More at spotlightchinatown.com.

 

ABOUT CHINATOWN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CENTER

 

The mission of the Chinatown Community Development Center (CCDC) is to build community and enhance the quality of life for San Francisco residents. We are a place-based community development organization serving primarily the Chinatown neighborhood, and also serve other areas including North Beach, Tenderloin, the Northern Waterfront, the Western Addition, Japantown, Polk Gulch, the Richmond, Civic Center and the South of Market area. CCDC play the roles of neighborhood advocates, community organizers, planners, developers, and managers of affordable housing. For more information visit: www.chinatowncdc.org.

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